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The Thinking Leader’s Project Management Process Maturity Model

Organizations and people strive to be mature. The question is how do you assess maturity? Some in the project management community strongly believe that creation and adherence to many processes equates to maturity.

Project management process maturity is in the eye of the beholder.

This means the amount of process should be dependent upon the context of the organization and more process does not necessarily result in more maturity.

Presuming the organizational leaders have identified the right amount of processes that best fit their organizational context, the thinking leader’s project management process maturity model can be characterized with three simple questions.

  1. Do we have a process?
  2. Do we follow the process to execute the work?
  3. Do we improve the process?

Posted by Dr. James Brown in Program Management, Project Management.

Simple-minded Organizations Create Project Failure

Having lived in Florida 30 years, I have had encounters with all kinds of snakes and even had a five-foot alligator that occasionally sunned itself by one of my palm trees. I asked my new neighbor how long he had lived in Florida. He replied that he had lived in Florida before and this surprised me because he leaves his garage door open hours at a time. I told him that I have already caught four small snakes this year in my garage with glue traps and I keep my garage door closed, only leaving a very small crack on the side of the door at its base, because like most garage doors it doesn’t seal perfectly. He thanked me, but still keeps his garage door open for hours at a time.  

Posted by Dr. James Brown in Discpline, Program Management, Project Management, Stakeholder Management.

Project Portfolio Management – Understanding Where Your Program is Today

There are three commonsense categories of past, present, and future when dealing with the basics of project portfolio management: (a) assessing where your program has been, (b) understanding where your program is today, and (c) driving where your program is going.

Understanding Where Your Program is Today

Posted by Dr. James Brown in Portfolio Management, Program Management.

Project Portfolio Management – Assessing Where Your Program Has Been

There are three commonsense categories of past, present, and future when dealing with the basics of project portfolio management: (a) assessing where your program has been, (b) understanding where your program is today, and (c) driving where your program is going.

Assessing Where Your Program Has Been

Spanish philosopher George Santayana said, “Those who cannot learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” Unfortunately, many organizations do not look back at the preceding year with enough thoroughness. The leader should look back at the preceding year and document the following:

  1. What were the business’s goals and targets for the year?
  2. What was the variance of actual results compared with those goals?
  3. What was the root cause of each variance?

Posted by Dr. James Brown in Portfolio Management, Program Management.

Project Reserve: Eight Tips You Should Know

Project Reserve: Eight Tips You Should Know

A key aspect leading to  a successful project outcome is having adequate project reserve.  Adequate project reserve also ensures a smoother, less stressful journey to the successful project outcome.  Inadequate project reserve is rarely cited as a cause of project failure, but it is a contributing factor to the failure of many projects. Having adequate reserve is just common sense.  Below are eight tips you should know about project reserve.

1.       Make sure you have it. –  Ask for project reserve.  Use all your pervasive influence skills (Influence the Psychology of Persuasion, How to Get People To Do Stuff, Magic Words) to get the reserve.  If you cannot get adequate reserve through influence of the proper channels, then sneak it in.

Posted by Dr. James Brown in Leadership Skills, Program Management, Project Management.